Book Review: The Locksmith, by Barbara Howe

Available in bookshops nationwide.

cv_the_locksmithWho is the Locksmith, and what role does he play in this fantasy tale? You will keep this question in mind as you read through the adventures of Lucinda Guillierre, a young girl living with her stepsister Claire and her stepmother, in the magical world of Frankland, ruled by The Office.

The Office was created in historic times by the Great Coven, which established the four offices of Air, Fire, Earth, and Water, and their leaders. Each Office has a Guild, for the study and training of Witches and Wizards of each element.

Unsettled by her lack of magical progress, she resigns herself to a future as a normal person, but agrees to take her sister Claire to challenge the path to meet the Fire Warlock, to have a wish granted. She takes with her, her only true possessions her father left her —two large books of the history of the magic which fills their world. Hold that thought as you read…

Claire wants to use Lucinda to pass the challenge and meet the Warlock, to make her wish, and to have Lucinda work off the exchange for the spell. That’s not quite how things turn out. Lucinda is the one who gets the wish, and in her three years at the Fire Guild serves in the kitchen, between her studies of magic. She takes some time realising that those who see her as a potential Fire Witch are right.

As her studies progress, so do her feelings for the Fire Warlock, and she realises he is the writer of her own two history of magic books. As the story develops, the realm in which they live becomes turbulent with political rumours of the threat of attack from Europa, which surrounds Frankland. Amid the turmoil, we are with Lucinda as she faces rivalry, hostility, and jealousy—and fear.

Lucinda’s story in this book ends most satisfactory, yet with just enough unknowns to make the reader want, as I do, the second in the series. A really great closing, and of all the modern fantasies I have read, this is a definite leader.

Reviewed by Lynne McAnulty-Street

The Locksmith: Book 1 in the ‘Reforging’ series
by Barbara Howe
Published by SQ Mag
ISBN: 9781925496284

 

Book Review: Ruined, by Amy Tintera

cv_ruinedAmy Tintera places her reader right bang in the middle of the action in her intense, adventure fantasy novel Ruined.

Ruined tells the story of Emelina Flores’ quest for revenge. Once a princess of Ruina, Em’s whole world was turned upside down when Lera invaded her country, taking away her everything. She had parents, but now they are both slaughtered, she had a home, but now it has been burnt to the ground, and she had a sister, but she has been locked up in an enemy kingdom. Hunted as one of Ruina, now all Emelina has is her thirst for revenge.

Armed with a fierce determination to make the Lera King pay, Em sneaks into her enemy’s kingdom, posing as his son’s betrothed. Possessing no magic as a useless Ruined? It won’t matter to Em as she uses her sword skills and intelligence to complete her mission, that is, if her rage-filled heart can withstand the tentative touch of an enemy prince.

Highly recommended for fans of fantasy novels such as Throne of Glass, The Winner’s Curse and Cruel Beauty. Although the plot sounds a bit cliché with the whole main character playing a role in order to infiltrate the enemy but falling in love with the enemy part, Ruined is by no means boring. In fact, it has an action-filled plotline and a story that takes place over the course of only a few days. Also, it gets into the nitty-gritty very quickly. During the first chapter, I was immediately shocked into attention. Amy Tintera introduces us to Ruined’s brutal world with a cold-blooded murder of Princess Mary by none other than the protagonist of the tale herself. Yet despite the ruthless attitude of many of the characters, including Em, we find ourselves unable to condemn them because of the merciless world they live in. Also, it sometimes adds to our curiosity and the intrigue of the novel.

Overall, I enjoyed this book with its intense action and interesting romance as two people from totally contrasting situations come together: Em with her dark world, and Cas with his mostly worry-free one. However, if I had to criticise the novel, I would say that events developed a little too quickly since Em and Cas go from not feeling anything for each other at all to suddenly being quite in love. Also, the characters could have been developed more so we grow a stronger attachment to them. But as a whole, a wickedly good start to an awesome trilogy. Looking forward to finding out what becomes of Em and Cas in the next instalment.

Reviewed by Elinor Wang
A & U Reading Ambassador

Ruined
by Amy Tintera
Published by Allen & Unwin
ISBN 9781760290641

Book Review: Smoke, by Dan Vyleta

Available in bookshops nationwide.

cv_smokeI chose to read and review this book because of its intriguing premise – what if sin were visible? What if, every time you did (or even thought) something ‘bad’, your body emitted smoke?

Dan Vyleta’s new YA novel imagines a Victorian England where smoke has become not just the visual manifestation of sin but a tool of class oppression: upper-class people never smoke, working-class people smoke all the time. Rich people’s white clothing remains white; poor people’s clothing is covered in soot. (The middle classes don’t really appear, apart from the odd mention: “Burghers may smoke, once in a while. One does not expect better of them.”)

I found the premise of human smoke to be utterly fascinating, and a good thing too, because plot- and character-wise Smoke is almost completely run-of-the-mill. Keen YA readers will find all their favourite tropes: young people who have to save the world, a teenage girl torn between two male love interests (one of whom is kind and openly in love with her, and the other of whom is a sexy bad boy whose attentions are more ambiguous), adults who turn out to be untrustworthy and/or dangerous, etc.

Smoke opens in a vicious upper-class boarding school near Oxford where the children of the rich are sent to have the smoke beaten out of them. Our heroes are two schoolboys: Thomas (brooding, dark past, possibly a ‘chosen one’) and Charlie (helpful, kind, faithful companion). They are tortured by an older boy, the prefect Julius (cruel, entitled, arrogant). Over the Christmas hols they’re sent to stay with Thomas’s uncle, Baron Naylor, where they meet the baron’s daughter & third protagonist, Livia (pretty, and thus a romantic goal for both Thomas and Charlie; intelligent, self-disciplined to the point of aggravating piousness). Lady Naylor, a scientist and revolutionary, reveals that All Is Not As It Seems, that the aristocrats appear smokeless not because they’re morally superior but because they’ve found a way to game the system, and that the conspiracy to maintain the oppressive status quo goes All The Way To The Top. But can she be trusted? Our heroes must set off on a Quest to Discover the Truth!

Despite its occasional clunkiness, Smoke is an enjoyable read, with enough mystery and adventure to keep the reader turning pages. Although Vyleta seems to be more concerned with investigating the mechanics and meaning of human smoke than in the readability of his novel, this didn’t bother me, because I too found the whole concept intriguing.

Various adult characters serve as mouthpieces for different ideologies of smoke. The religious interpretation states that smoke is the manifestation of sin, and must be punished. The Enlightenment-inspired philosophers attempt to study smoke in a rational manner: “Every transgression leaves behind its own type of Soot and those versed in such matters can determine the severity of your crime just by studying the stain’s density and grit.” Maybe smoke is the symptom of a disease that science can cure? The Marxist interpretation says that smoke is a tool of class oppression: “Smoking ain’t a sin. It’s a weapon. Toffs use it to keep us down.” The humanist-socialist interpretation says that smoke is a natural expression of passion: “It’s the animal part of us that will not serve.”

At its best, Smoke is a fascinating alternative history that fully explores the central question, what if human bodies smoked? At its worst, it’s a trope-ridden YA novel that doesn’t quite manage to lift itself up from under the layers of plot strands and furious philosophising. An enjoyable light read.

Reviewed by Elizabeth Heritage

Smoke
by Dan Vyleta
Published by Weidenfield & Nicolson
ISBN  9780297609933

Book Review: Girls on Fire, by Robin Wasserman

Available now in bookshops nationwide.

cv_girls_on_fireReading Girls on Fire was like being sucked back in time through a swirling vortex of op shop petticoat dresses, faux fur coats, grunge t shirts, Chanel Noir nail polish and shrunken tees with old man suit pants. Of Workshop skirts and discarded Holiday T’s. Hidden seventh form blazers and squeaky clean class pictures. Of clothes that matched. Ironic hats. Of things that were ironed. Of the schoolgirl you were being drowned by the woman you would be.

And that’s exactly where we meet Hannah Dexter and Lacy Champlain – on the cusp of the rest of their lives. Hannah is in the last year of high school in Nowheresville and Lacy is the new kid in town preaching the Gospel of Grunge and offering the Communion of Cobain. She’s the weirdo, the odd one out and she doesn’t care.

Lacy and Hannah become a gang of 2. Hannah is no longer invisible. She’s Dex. A person. She can see. She can be seen. She has a friend she can rely on no matter what. But Lacy has secrets and she’s not as reliable as Dex thinks.

When one of the coolest kids at school blows his brains out on Halloween, suburban paradise goes into satanic panic. Are there devil worshippers afoot? Who or what is leading the youth astray?

As a small town looks long and hard for any signs of corruption from the outside, Dex starts to realise that maybe the kid’s aren’t alright. Maybe they never have been, maybe they’ve had the devil in them all along.

At times cruel and dangerous, always intoxicating, Girls on Fire rings true on many levels, capturing the all-consuming be all end all of peer validation that takes place in the mid- to late-teens. (I know you can remember the name of the bully from your last year at school.) Most of all this books reminds you of what it feels like to be 18, when everything was new, and so much of it stung. Pleasure excitement success anticipation; embarrassment fear envy shame humiliation anger. But you had a best friend with you by your side, to get through those things with you, to share the burn so you were never alone. Best Friends Forever. Blood Sisters. Some bonds can’t be broken. Some things can’t be undone. We were all Dex and Lacy. Some of us still are.

Reviewed by Sarah McMullan @sarahmcmullannz

Girls on Fire
by Robin Wasserman
Published by Little, Brown
ISBN 9781408707111

Book Review: Devolve – The Wolf, by Mike Hooper

Available in selected bookshops nationwide.

cv_devolve_the_wolfDevolve is the first in a series by a Christchurch author and is independently published.

The design is competent and professional, and the story matches. It is a dystopian/post-apocalyptic setting, where the people have been forced, by war, to live underground. Here they are ruled over by the amicable King Brown, who desires, above all, to be liked and admired by his subjects. Our main character is 4N, or Foren, and all of the characters follow a similar naming system. We have KC (Casey), an intelligent and caring girl; GO (Geo), belligerent and thorny; VC (Vici), kind, secretive and naive and many others, all students in Professor Will’s class. All students who are hoping to be chosen as part of the team that will venture upon to the surface in search of relics.

Foren is an orphan, and his greatest desire is to be a Cat – a surface explorer that seeks relics – like his mother. Although he is chosen for the team, it is instead as a Wolf, a protector and guardian. Together with five of his class-mates, he must breach the hostile surface, where the earth is poisoned and the water polluted, where merely breathing the air can kill.

Or can it?

Foren and his friends uncover not only a dangerous conspiracy, but enter into a deadly and violent game of survival. This is not a light read – there is a bloody body count and a few moments where I feared Hooper was channeling his inner George RR Martin. Filled with twists, turns and some rather unexpected surprises. A competent, and relatively easy read, with barely a dull moment. I look forward to reading more.

Reviewed by Angela Oliver

Devolve – The Wolf
by Mike Hooper
Self-published
ISBN 9780473342814

Book Review: This Raging Light, by Estelle Laure

Available in bookshops nationwide.

cv_this_raging_lightWhen Lucille Bennett’s mother leaves town to have ‘a break from everything’, Lucille and her sister Wren are left to fend for themselves. This is easier said than done – there are bills to pay, suspicious neighbours to avoid and grades to keep up at school.

Lucille gets a job at a Mexican restaurant run by the eccentric Fred, and her best friend Eden is happy to help take care of Wren. Even so, Lucille’s problems are piling up as fast as the lies she is forced to tell. People are starting to talk, and the Bennetts’ secrets are in danger of being discovered. Just when it seems things couldn’t get more complicated, Lucille finds herself falling in love with her best friend’s brother Digby. Could there be worse timing for something so wonderful to happen?

This book quickly proved itself to be much for than just another YA romance. This Raging Light is a story centred on themes of family and friendship, and I actually think it would have been just as good without the romance. Lucille’s relationships with her sister and her best friend are much more important to the story than her love for Digby.

I was impressed by how realistic Lucille’s character is; her story is very well-written. She’s a strong, hard-working protagonist who is the main force pushing the story forward – you’d be surprised how often the main characters of young adult literature aren’t like this. No helpless Bella Swan characters to be found in this book. I was also surprised by how maturely Lucille dealt with the situations both of her parents were in. Forgiveness is another theme that you don’t see enough of in young adult novels.

I recommend This Raging Light to any teen readers who are looking for a book that they will struggle to put down; the vivid characters are what make this one special. They’ll capture your attention and have you rooting for them from beginning to end.

Reviewed by Tierney Reardon

This Raging Light
by Estelle Laure
Published by Orchard Books
ISBN 9781408340271

Book Review: Queen of Shadows, by Sarah J Maas

Available now in bookshops nationwide.

‘Be prepared to lose yourself in the most dangerously captivating series ever.’cv_queen_of_shadows

Sarah J Maas’s writing has never let me down. Her books, filled with elaborate, twisting plotlines and the best-developed characters, seem to come with a guarantee of being unputdownable. Queen of Shadows was no exception.

Queen of Shadows  is the highly anticipated fourth book of the ‘Throne of Glass’ series. In this book, Aelin Galathynius returns to claim what is rightfully hers, embracing her destiny as the Queen of Terrasen. Gone is her past self: Celaena Sardothein, the enslaved assassin trying to hide from her past. This time round, it is Aelin who returns to Adarlan and she does so prepared to fight for her friends, her people and her country. Yet, her evil foes are not as weak as she would like them to be (Of course, since one of them is the King of Assassins and the other, the King on the Glass Throne). The only question is, will Aelin be able reap vengeance from her previous masters or will she be the one to pay? Read it to find out and once again, be drawn into our favourite badass heroine’s story as she battles for the greater good.

Although I preferred the intrigue and romance of the first and second books more, I nevertheless enjoyed Queen of Shadows with its brilliant characters, vivid fantasy universe and racing plotline. If you are looking for a book with a strong, sassy female protagonist, a heart-pumping narrative and a beautiful yet dangerous fantasy universe to lose yourself in, then look no further than Queen of Shadows.

Warning: I advise you to wait until the weekends to read this book because once I picked it up, I found myself unable to put it down.

Reviewed by Elinor Wang, as part of the Allen & Unwin Ambassador programme.

Queen of Shadows
by Sarah J Maas
Published by Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN 9781408858615