Book Review: Where’s Kiwi NOW? Illustrated by Myles Lawford

Available in bookshops nationwide. 

cv_wheres_kiwi_now.jpgWith more than 800 things to spot this will keep the younger ones in your family occupied for an hour or two.

Kiwi is in his flying egg time-travel machine. Can you spot him?  Where is he?  Stegosaurus, Tyrannosaurus and Who-saurus? An you spot some of his mates; Sporty Sheep, Gumboot Guy, Wacky Wizard, Tricky Tuatara or Mystery Moa? They are all there. Are they visiting the Ice Age Rage or are they in the time of the taniwha and mystery moa or are they in the battle of the beasts – a riot in Rome where swords clash and chariots race? They have to be there somewhere.  What about the medieval upheaval in the dawn of dungeons and, dragons. Exploring across the high seas with cannons on pirate ships, plundering jewels and gold and so much more??

A book designed to keep the reader on their toes, seeing which character they can find out of Kiwi and his mates.

The attention to detail in the illustrations is staggering and having a Kiwi version of Where’s Wally is an added bonus for fans.  Suitable for all ages big and small, this is a great book to engage with the younger members of your family.

My granddaughters Quinn (4 years old) and Abby (7 years old) were both leaning in to me to see who could spot one of the characters the fastest. Great entertainment.

Reviewed by Christine Frayling

Where’s Kiwi NOW? 
Illustrated by Myles Lawford
Published by Scholastic NZ
ISBN 9781775435266

Book Review: Pathway of the Birds – The voyaging achievements of Māori and their Polynesian Ancestors, by Andrew Crowe

Available in bookshops nationwide.

cv_pathway_of_the_birdsAnthropologist Te Rangi Hiroa (Sir Peter Buck) described ancient Polynesians as supreme navigators of history. Their double-hulled, sewn plant canoes propelled by woven mat sails explored the far reaches of the Earth’s greatest ocean.

Captain James Cook between the years 1769 and 1779 visited more Polynesian islands than any other European explorer before him.

Andrew Crowe in Pathway of the Birds explores the history of movement among the islands of the Pacific and the means of transport with the development of boat designs and the possibilities and archaeological finds of some of the various remote islands in the Pacific and the deep ocean voyages that were deliberate and planned. He also notes the different species of native birds and lizards and how they differ between the islands, and the tools used by the inhabitants and the purpose for what they were used.

This covers a subject of great interest to many readers with over 400 photos and illustrations breaking up the text.

While I found this book extremely interesting I did struggle at times to take in the information. As a New Zealander whose ancestors come from other places this highlights to me the courage and tenacity of Polynesian inhabitants and their desire to travel and explore the Pacific.

Reviewed by Christine Frayling

Pathway of the Birds: The voyaging achievements of Māori and their Polynesian
Ancestors
by Andrew Crowe
Published by David Bateman Ltd
ISBN 9781869539610

Book Review: Broken Play, by Nicholas Sheppard

Available at selected bookshops nationwide.

cv_broken_planAlec Haudepin is 23 years old and ever since he can remember he has dreamed of playing for the All Blacks. Alec has struggled with his sexuality for as long as he can remember, while growing up in rural New Zealand at a rugby-obsessed high school, but as he’s got older it’s been harder to deny. His life is complicated further by blame his parents have put on him when his brother Mark was killed in a farm bike accident, which led eventually to their separation.

When Alec is selected to play rugby for his province, his dream of being an All Black is so near. The one problem he has is his temper, which is fueled further by alcohol. He comes close to it blowing up in his face, so down on his drinking and managing his temper becomes a number one priority.

Alec lives in an apartment building at which a new arrival attracts his attention; Jackie and her troubled son Maxim.

In the era Alec participated in the sport, the male fraternity would not tolerate or contemplate that homosexuality could ever co-exist. Covering his frustration with alcohol just exacerbated the problem.

With the enlightenment that has come with time I am surprised to still not be aware of any openly gay rugby players playing for provincial or national rugby teams. I daresay – I hope – this is only a matter of time.

I found Broken Play a compelling read and wish to thank this first-time author Nicholas Sheppard for writing such a book.

Reviewed by Christine Frayling

Broken Play
by Nicholas Sheppard
Published by RSVP Publishing
ISBN 9780994140814

Book Review: The Quaker, by Liam McIlvanney

Available in bookshops nationwide. 

cv_the_quakerThree women are murdered some weeks and months apart. DI Duncan McCormack is put in charge of why the murders haven’t been solved and why the murder squad haven’t managed to find the killer, getting him off the streets. There is fear amongst women as to where and who the killer will strike next.

McCormack is bought down from the Highlands in Scotland to Glasgow to join the investigation. He finds shoddy police work with nothing linking to anybody or where the murderer could have come from. The killer is nicknamed ‘The Quaker’ because of third hand memories of a man dressed in a suit, with a regimental tie and a religious pin on the lapel of his suit.

Who is The Quaker? Is he part of an organised crime syndicate or is he part of a network with a member of that syndicate inside the police force?

This is a ripper of a story with hardly a page where some new information isn’t imparted to the reader building up the profile of the killer. I found it difficult to put down the book at times but sleep is one of the necessary parts of life, so I was often waiting for another “spare” moment to pick up where I had left the off. The ending is superb.

Reviewed by Christine Frayling

The Quaker
by Liam McIlvanney
Published by HarperCollins NZ
ISBN 9780008259921

Book Review:  Woolly Wally, by Dawn McMillan, illustrated by Ross Kinnaird

Available in bookshops nationwide. 

cv_woolly_wallyIf you are familiar with Doctor Grundy’s Undies, I need a new Bum and other stories, and Mister Spears and his Hairy Ears, you will adore this offering from Dawn McMillan and Ross Kinnaird. What a great book. Woolly Wally was first published in 2006 and is now back in this latest edition.

Woolly Wally was a ram who stood master of his flock, full of importance, ready to show off his beautiful wool, thick and crinkled, extra fine, grey and wrinkled.  He was sure that his perfectly formed, uniquely shaped, individualised, spiral, ribbed and oversized horns were absolutely perfect and that he as incredibly handsome.  He was also sure that all the sheep were in love with him and that when spring came all the ewes would be mums and the fields full of his perfect offspring, so what a shock Woolly Wally got when he heard the word “shear”.

A wonderful story with a great moral. Pride comes before a fall, and in Wally’s case he falls far.

As with all books that Dawn McMillan and Ross Kinnaird have collaborated on, small readers will not be disappointed.  My 3 ½ year old granddaughter Quinn had it packed in her bag ready to go home before I could turn around.

Reviewed by Christine Frayling

Woolly Wally
by Dawn McMillan, illustrated by Ross Kinnaird
Published by Oratia Media
ISBN 9780947506421

Book Review: Flit the Fantail and the Flying Flop, by Kat Merewether

Available in bookshops nationwide.

cv_flit_the_fantail_and_the-flying_flopThis is the first in a new series from Kat Merewether, the author of Kuwi the Kiwi.

Flit is a fantail chick. He is not allowed to fly as his wings are not strong enough. Ma and Pa Fantail want him to stay safe in his nest while they go off to find food to feed Flit. Flit feels safe up high in the Kowhai tree in his nest but he is soon bored so he climbs to the edge of the nest to try and get a tasty midge. He stretches but cannot quite reach it. He spreads his wings but of course the inevitable happens, he first of all floats then he falls. Flit tries to fly back up but no, he falls down to the ground.

Kiki the Kaka chick comes down to see what the fuss is about. He thinks he can help Flit get back up to his nest. He puts Flit onto a fern and then tries to flick Flit back up in the air to get back to his nest, but no, Flit flip flops down again.

Bit and Bob, the black robins come along and offer to help. This time they pick Flit up by the feet, holding on trying to fly at the same time. Of course, this doesn’t work either. Keri the Kiwi and Ruru both try their luck as well, to no avail.

This is a great story about what can be achieved when everybody uses their individual strengths. Gorgeous illustrations tie this wonderful story together.

I read this to 3 ½ year old Quinn. She was quite sure that Flit could manage to get back all on his own but loved the fact that he had so many friends who thought that they could help.

Reviewed by Christine Frayling

Flit the Fantail and the Flying Flop
by Kat Merewether
Published by Scholastic NZ
ISBN 9781775435105

Book Review: Sam and the Dog from the Sea, by Judy and Dick Frizzell

Available in bookshops nationwide.

cv_sam_and_the_dog_from_the_sea.jpgSam is an old sailor who still wears his captain’s hat with a seagull’s feather stuck into the band. He lives in an old tramcar decorated with treasures sourced from his scavenging among the flotsam and jetsam that the tides bring in.

A storm is on the horizon and Sam, lying in bed can hear the roaring of the winds and the lashing of the rain against his windows. He gets up early the next morning walking along the beach looking for possible treasures. He finds what he thinks is a dead seagull or an old towel but as he picks it up he sees it is a dog, probably dead, but then a little brown eye opens. Taking it home wrapped up in his woollen jersey he hurries home. Putting the dog in front of the fire Sam towels the poor animal dry, fluffing up his soft white fur.

This is a beautiful story of love and friendship between a dog and an old man. Gorgeous illustrations, and the accompanying storyline is delightful.

Dick Frizzell is well-known to most New Zealanders as an artist. His wife Judy had written the story with Dick using his talents to compliment what is an already wonderful story.

This book was first published more than 30 years ago in 1988. On some friends urging, Judy and Dick Frizzell released this book once again. A fantastic decision as I haven’t read it before to any of my grandchildren. This story was received enthusiastically by my 3 ½ year old granddaughter Quinn.

Reviewed by Christine Frayling

Sam and the Dog from the Sea
by Judy and Dick Frizzell
Published by David Ling Publishing
ISBN 9781927305416