Book Review: The Suicide Club, by Sarah Quigley

Available in bookshops nationwide.

cv_the_suicide_clubFor very different reasons, Bright, Gibby and Lace are all troubled: worn down by life, tired, depressed, and in need of intervention. Bright is the author of a surprise bestseller but feels immense pressured from the sudden fame and his dysfunctional relationship with his reverend father. Mysterious orphan Lace is beautiful, fragile and attracts men like moths to a proverbial flame. But she is unsettled. “[I]n spite of her unblemished skin and starry eyes, she’s old. From the age of eight, she’s felt as old as eh hills and it isn’t at all comfortable.” Lace’s best friend Gibby, loyal, protective and desperately in love with Lace, fears for her stability. Gibby has his own challenges that make life a burden; not least among them, witnessing Bright’s attempt to end it all by leaping from a building.

The three twenty year olds leave England in search of solace and treatment at The Palace, an experimental institution in Bavaria under the guidance of Dr Geoffrey. In their attempts to find some semblance of peace, they find love, but is love enough to save someone?

This is a beautifully, almost lyrically, written novel by New Zealand author Sarah Quigley. It is a story of love and friendship, tragedy and loss. The book dares to discuss one of society’s last taboos – the desire to end it all when life becomes too much. Quigley treats the topic with sensitivity and compassion but doesn’t flinch from confronting its harsh and haunting reality.

Although there are undoubtedly dark moments, as is probably inevitable given the title of the book, there are many wonderfully lighter moments. There is humour amongst the pain. The other characters at The Palace are quirky and funny, with some of the group therapy sessions bordering on the absurd. There is a particularly comical fight scene as Bright and Gibby compete for Lace’s affections.

Quigley also has a delightful ability to conjure up a scene with sparse but poetic description: ‘The dawn is bruised orange, the colour of over-ripe apricots.’ The Bavarian scene is almost otherworldly and dreamlike.

This is a haunting and thoughtful story, a very clever novel.

Review by Tiffany Matsis

The Suicide Club
by Sarah Quigley
Published by Vintage New Zealand
ISBN 9780143771012

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