Book Review: Tuna and Hiriwa, by Ripeka Takotowai Goddard, illustrated by Kimberly Andrews

Available in bookshops nationwide.

cv_tuna_and_hiriwaOne of the joys of reviewing books is that I get first look at some wonderful adaptations of old tales, and a chance to see our Aotearoa stories being presented to the next generation. Tuna and Hiriwa is a superb example of this.

Set on the banks of the Rangitikei River we meet Hiriwa, the sparkling dancing glow worm. In contrast we then discover Tuna, the eel. He watches and wants what she has. Their conversation suggests a solution to him but his attempts fail miserably. His actions bring about a change for both of them and give a good explanation as why things are as they are. Of course there are always consequences for actions, as Tuna discovers.

This is a simple tale, told in a clear sequential style. The illustrations match the text well, showing the muted colours of the river and the shimmering light of the moon and Hiriwa. I read it to my 10- and 11-year-olds, and they enjoyed the story, but also caught on to the moral of the tale. “Be careful what you wish for”.

Tuna and Hiriwa builds on the growing number of Maori myths and legends which have been produced for our next generation. It is heartening to see authors and illustrators working to ensure teachers and parents have access to good New Zealand picture books. Huia Publishers continue to play an important part in this process.

Reviewed by Kathy Watson

Tuna and Hiriwa
By Ripeka Takotowai Goddard, illustrated by Kimberly Andrews
Published by Huia Publishers
ISBN 9781775502272

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