Book Review: Three Cities: Seeking Hope in the Anthropocene, by Rod Oram

Available in bookshops nationwide.

cv_three_citiesRod Oram is an interesting example of a business journalist who has escaped the somewhat narrow confines of the daily press to become a columnist, and is able to discuss some of the big issues confronting the world. On his most recent Tuesday morning slot on RNZ National he talked about civilisation being at risk from global climate change and ecological destruction. The man-made environmental change to planet is what Oram means when referring to the ‘anthropocene’ in the title. But he remains in a minority of financial journalists who delve into environmental issues.

So Oram goes to three of the largest metropolitan areas in the world to look for others who are interested in ecological questions. This looks promising at first, even though the opening chapter about Beijing includes a lot of rather dry statistical information. And there he finds about the idea of ‘ecological civilisation’ which China confronts as it continues to industrialise, but faces certain financial and institutional challenges. In the conclusion Oram refers to other ideas he discovers in the Western metropoles, like the ‘doughnut economy’ and the ‘circular economy’. The sub-title of the book claims that “conventional economic policies are failing worldwide”, and he refers in the text to the ‘lifeless’ economic theory that plagues elite policymaking in the West. Oram also mentions something called Californian Ideology based on Silicon Valley values.

But, unfortunately, the book doesn’t really delve into the new ideas in any sustained way. Oram’s visit to three cities is based on his own familiarity with them, rather than really seeking new experience and opinion. There is a lot of personal narrative here for such a short book. And there are quite a few digressions as well, though some involve finding a Kiwi connection, like the Chinese store owned by Japanese interests which sells a Comvita gift box of 5 honey related items for 3031 yuan ($NZ750). He also refers to some interesting facts about a New Zealand firm LanzaTech, which has relocated to Chicago. However, I found the chapter about London rather disjointed, with an odd beginning about Jeremy Corbyn and Yanis Varoufakis. Oram writes quite a bit about the Financial Times where he worked in London, and the Northwestern University where he studied in the USA, but this does not add much to the big themes.

There is another version of this story which Oram presented for the 2015 Bruce Jesson Foundation lecture. There he talked about three crises which are linked: a fiscal or financial crisis for global economy beginning in 1971; the ‘Eco shock’ which has also been developing over the same time; and what he calls the ‘Corporate shock’, as exemplified in the Volkswagen company’s systematic deception over carbon emissions from its vehicles, being emblematic of the environmental costs of big business. If only the book were more focussed on the analysis of these issues, though the suggestions for local change in New Zealand at the end of the book are useful.

Reviewed by Simon Boyce

Three Cities: Seeking Hope in the Anthropocene
by Rod Oram
Published by BWB Books (Text series)
ISBN 9780994135407

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